Posts Tagged ‘Journalism Technology’

Question No. 26: “What’s the web site again?”

November 3, 2009

Ira Question | Written by Nathan Mattise

We talked about innovating new ways of communicating a story in my web journalism class tonight. We’ve worked with slideshows, audio interviews, video sequencing and, of course, text already.  Our professors showed us some free web tools to try some things (umapper.com for instance) but my mind immediately went to the work of Jonathan Harris.  He’s someone a new media prof. of mine turned me on to and I immediately began questioning how viable my future in online storytelling was.

The thought that next came to mind was the TAL web site. Ira Glass and co. were adventurous enough to take storytelling to the video medium for two successful seasons of TAL TV. Radio has held strong for them and translated fine to podcasting…

…so the  next logical step…

Why not support your storytelling through innovative online multimedia (or even do uniquely online pieces)? Do you have plans for the TAL web site beyond just storing and organizing your radio stories?

Links: Number27.org | In Pursuit of the Trivial

E-mail us if you have a question for Ira Glass to discuss or if you have insight on this one.

Question No. 7: “Will you be quiet?”

September 29, 2009

Ira Question | Written by Nathan Mattise

In less than 48 hours, I have a two-minute multimedia pieces due for class. It’s something the school values highly –  making all their new grad students produce one within weeks of coming to campus. Some do it successfully and others not so much. I’m hoping to be included in the former.

Naturally I sought out some of TAL on TV to inspire me on the production end (I wish I could find content like they do, my reach is simply not as far or as thorough at this point in time). Along with the multimedia work over at NPR.com, there’s one immediate difference between what I saw and what I was instructed to aspire for…me.

This American Life uses narration in nearly everything. I can only recall an episode here or there that relies on old tapes to tell the story without a TAL storyteller. On TV (closer to the product I am trying to produce, it’s a Soundslides project), only the urban horseback riding story from Season II comes to mind as a story done solely through the source.

Faculty would laugh at me if I wrote a print story comprised only of quotes. I think my broadcast compadres would echo that sentiment. However, with Soundslides I am supposed to allow my sources to speak without filter or structure on my part. Yet, the folks I admire as storytellers are doing similar projects but repeatedly opting for narration.

I’m a bit confused…

Why do you opt for narration in a majority of your pieces on This American Life? If given ideal sources and an ideal story, would you still opt for it or is the Utopian goal a piece that stands solely on its own?

Links: NPR.com| NHInteractive| Knight Digital Journalism

E-mail us if you have a question for Ira Glass to discuss or if you have insight on this one.

Question No. 2: “Please describe in 140 characters or less…”

September 22, 2009

Ira Question | Written by Nathan Mattise

Maybe it’s just because I’ve been exposed to a lot of David Pogue hoopla in the past two days, but doesn’t Ira Glass seem a bit technologically nostalgic?  He’s embraced the podcast, but the latest route to provide insight and storytelling to fans is Twitter. Ira Glass does have an account, but he’s posted only two Tweets all time including:

http://twitter.com/iraglass/status/1546019478

Twitter / Ira Glass: This account will be on hi … via kwout

So, in a 140 characters or less…

With your interest in journalism and in keeping tabs on what’s interesting in everyday life, why have you personally passed on Twitter?

Links: Twitter| The Newshouse | Podcasting News

E-mail us if you have a question for Ira Glass to discuss or if you have insight on this one